Monday, 2 September 2013

Seven: Day 2 - Seven memories with my father

I am participating in Write Tribe's Festival of Words from 1st to 7th September where nearly 82 bloggers are writing on the theme of Seven for Seven days - a post a day! Today is Day 2.


It's quite rare that I mention my dad leave alone writing about him. I think this is the first time I've come close to writing something about him. He passed on when I was thirteen and since then it has been a long while. I have outgrown the memories that we shared but there are some that remain evergreen and those are the ones I am sharing today. Here you go:

1. I remember sitting with him on Saturday afternoons, sipping hot mutton soup made by my amma and listening to Biblical stories. He was the one who started me on with those interesting stories which held me in rapt attention.

2. Going hungry on a certain Sunday afternoon because I was yet to memorise Psalm 23. Eventually I did memorise that passage and till date I remember what I had learnt that day.

3. Going with him to his office and while returning we stood outside a house because we heard one of our favourite songs, 'Oh Lord, my God, when I in awesome wonder' playing in a record inside the house. We stood there till the song got over and then resumed our return journey.

4. Close to his office was a water body which had reeds growing around then borders of the water. Sometimes he brought some of those reeds neatly cut to our home. I would put them into a bottle of water. Those reeds with their deep maroon colour would look beautiful.

5. Being slapped hard when I interrupted him while he was conversing with a neighbour. The reason: We were in the middle of an interesting story-telling session when the neighbour came home. I was quite impatient to listen to the rest of the story and barged during the conversation. The response was a sharp slap. I had learnt what I had to that day!

6. Once when I got very low marks in my Geography exam, my father refused to sign the Report-card. Later he did sign it but left a note along with it with his name signed on that note. It read: "If your marks are like this, I will not sign your Report-card. All the best."

7. I never saw my father enter the kitchen but on those rare occasions when my amma went to visit her parents in Trichy, my dad would prepare delicious food. I still remember the taste of some items that he judiciously attempted to cook.

I must admit that his memories don't come without coercing but the above seven do come effortlessly. Those days were different. It has been 21 years since the day he left us. Life goes on.

It's strange how minds come up with similar topics. Here's Karan who writes at Scribble who has also written a post for his father for the Write Tribe's Festival of Words. Read here.

34 comments:

  1. Dear Susan - I know you have dug deep to share these memories and I'm honoring that by not saying anything. Except....huggggggs. ♥

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    1. Thanks Corinne. Hugs back. Those memories are lovely.

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  2. No words....I'm gonna do just what Corinne Did ! <3<3
    Love,
    Swetha

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  3. Wow !! Lovely memories indeed and I'm sure you would cherish them forever. Fathers will always be our ultimate heroes.

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    1. As much as I treasure the memories, he wasn't my hero and all, Diana. I lost him while I was barely thirteen and don't remember much except for a few things. I wish I had known him better!

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  4. I don't really know what to say...except that few memories are deep embedded in our hearts and even with time they bring a strong emotion over us! Beautiful way to cherish this...*love*

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    1. I cherish these memories and they are few things that I remember of my dad. Thanks for coming by Aditi. Welcome to the Meanderings!

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  5. That - end of the day - is the sum of human existence. The memories a person leaves behind. The fonder the memories, the better the life lead.

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    1. Spot on Suresh. I live by memories and they sometimes drive me to the brink of insanity. Sigh.

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  6. That's a very warm post. Hugs to you Susan. <3

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  7. Memories of your father are so intense and profound. Sad, he left when you were too small. Hugs Susan.

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  8. I know how much you miss your father.
    Point No.6 : same pinch. Next test I scored full in geo and was thrilled but my father still made me remember the last test marks.
    These memories are our treasure to be carried on for ever. I too lost my father 15 years ago.

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  9. Generally people used to walk 'down the memory lane' but you seemed to have dug deep underground and brought back those olden golden moments with your dad :-)

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  10. hmm...emotional post. could sense the irreparable loss all through...

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  11. Keep these memories close to you and you will have him always. Hugs to you babe. <3

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  12. love always Susan..

    life goes on, one of the quotes from Jyothi's first day of prompt as well, who else but our dear Frost wrote it down..

    hugs

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  13. what a beautiful and touching post... the memories do stay for forever :)

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  14. Beautiful memories Susan. Life does goes on and so does the ache. Hugs.

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  15. Awww Susan this is such a beautiful post...Nostalgia :)

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  16. Memories move us forward and the person lives with us through those memories.

    Hugs to you Susan... <3

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  17. Such a touching post Susan....such wonderful memories and such a wonderful tribute to your father...

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  18. I respect your courage on speaking about your dad.
    Cheerz

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  19. Yes, Dear Susan Deborah, those days WERE different. It is always so.

    My father, another Steve Elsaesser, also was a story teller, from my earliest memory. It had not yet occurred to me that the blind can "see" things in a story--as in life--of which others had lost focus. AND...his stories ALWAYS changed just enough that ya didn't want to miss a single word.

    After age 50, when he could no longer hear, children would flock to gather around him to listen..all ages. He always made his tales a learning experience, some moral, some memorable "bon mots" included.

    When he could neither see nor hear, he only knew children were present if they touched him. And they DID! Always, the fearlessness of children around him astonished me.

    Adults would give us a LOT of room to walk by, so they would not have to "look at" his disfigured eyes nor--OMG!--"touch" him.

    Meanwhile, young people, ages 2-13 would climb all over him in the sand and water at the beach in Naples. HE LOVED IT! It seemed to me that children would and did realize (somehow) that his ("Broken eyes", they called them!) could "see" God in everything...everywhere. (His occupation: dairy farmer.)

    Thanks for bringing back that memory to me, Susan Deborah!
    PEACE and LIGHT!

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  20. Hi Susan...I am lost for words. I understand what writing those memories would have been for you. May the cherished memories of your father be with you always.

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  21. Point 3 is such a lovely memory. I can almost picture a father daughter listening to the song. Hugs!

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  22. Hi friend ! it is definitely painful to talk about someone who is no more and yet so close to our heart, appreciate your courage, hugs to you ..

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  23. Father the world it means...i would not want to intervene in your thoughts about him....we are in the same boat...i've written about him on day one of the Tribe - Karan - Father

    you can check out my post here:-
    Karan - Grand Mother

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  24. Not all memories of our parents can be pleasant but in all, they did shape us and the perception with which we view the world. I can quite see the emotion you had when you wrote this post! {{hugs}}

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  25. Susan a tight hug to you my fellow traveller. I too lost my dad at the age of sixteen and life has taken its own pitfalls without the pillar around. He was my hero. Whatever i am today, my thoughts,existence and approach towards life is indebted to him :)

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  26. Loved reading about your memories and some of them overlap mine, Susan.

    Memories esp fond still tend to give goosebumps whether they be yours or mine...such a magical human relationship we all share.

    Hugs!

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